Author Archives: Vincent Golden

About Vincent Golden

Curator of Newspapers and Periodicals, American Antiquarian Society

The Campaign Newspaper Title Quiz: The Answers

CT_Hartford_SoberSecond

Last week we asked readers to figure out which five from a list of thirty nineteenth-century campaign newspaper titles were fake. Here are the answers. How did you do? Sober Second Thought (Hartford, CT), 1841 A Democratic newspaper supporting Martin Van Buren. Castigator (Middletown, CT), 1840 Another Democratic newspaper supporting Martin Van Buren. A Kick in the Pants - Fake ...

The Campaign Newspaper Title Quiz

The Rail Splitter

This election year the verbal thrusts and parries have been fast and thick throughout the primaries. Today Facebook and Twitter are as important as radio and TV in spreading the vitriolic name-calling and accusations of various candidates. In the nineteenth century politicians had to resort to print media, and one way to do this was ...

It’s the time of year to Adopt-a-Book!

Liberty Pole Subscriber list

What do a wolverine, sunshine, runaway sailors, weaving, and baseball have in common?  These are the titles or subjects of items available at our ninth annual Adopt-a-Book program! Once again our intrepid curators have put together a group of items acquired over the past year or so and put them up for “adoption.”  Supporters of ...

Unusual Titles: The Answers

5441_0001

Last week we posted ten nineteenth-century newspaper titles, which included three fake ones. Here are the real titles from that list with images of the mastheads as proof. 1. Sucker and Farmer’s Record (Pittsfield, IL).  March 30, 1843. At that time people of that region were sometimes known as suckers.  See the reply in this previous blog ...

Unusual Titles: The Challenge

husband always reading newspaper

When you look at the names of current newspapers you see much sameness in the titles.  How often do you see Times, Post, Globe, Union, Herald, Sun, Independent, or Tribune as part of the title? Once in a while you might run across a paper still published today, such as the Quincy Herald-Whig (IL), which ...

The Asylum Journal Presents Presidential Candidates

AsylumJournal_0001

Asylum Journal  (Brattleboro, VT)  November 22, 1842 Published every Tuesday, By the inmates of the Vermont Asylum. The Asylum Journal was published at the Vermont Asylum for the Insane, a private institution founded in 1834 by Anna Hunt Marshall.  It used a humane form of treatment on its patients, based on the theories of William Tuke ...

You calling me yellow?

The Silver World

Let’s say you are the publisher of a newspaper in a small mining town in Colorado and you run out of the regular paper you use to print your publication.  What do you do?  In the case of The Silver World published in Lake City, Colorado, you find an alternative source of paper. Recently AAS acquired ...

The Conundrum of Printing Chinese Newspapers

Golden Hill

“A book holds a house of gold.” – Chinese proverb AAS has quite a variety of American newspapers in different languages: German, French, Spanish, Italian, Polish, Welsh, Cherokee, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, and Hawaiian.  There is one language, however, that provided a unique challenge for printers.  All of the newspapers above are letterpress.  Each letter is ...

Mocked by its own title.

516375_0001

One feature that makes working at the American Antiquarian Society a joy is the number of resources available at our fingertips.   Our reading room abounds in reference books and bibliographies. Our stacks are filled with county and local histories, city directories, genealogical publications, and other publications. We have access to numerous online databases. When an ...

An Unusual Advertisement

489331_0001

The Philadelphian  (Philadelphia, PA).  February 1846. This is a scarce monthly publication filled with stories, tidbits of information, and small jokes for the entertainment and amusement of the reader. What makes this particular issue interesting is an advertisement on page 2 that takes up almost two-thirds of the page.  It is for drugs, medicines, chemicals, paints, oils, ...

Now that’s a hat!

459391_0001

The People’s Pathfinder  (St. Louis, MO)  Spring 1853.  Edited by William H. Keevill. This is a rare advertising piece for the dry goods palace of Hubbell & Hunt at Corinthian Hall in St. Louis, Missouri.  As can be seen from the large woodcut on the front page, this publication is about hats.  The articles are about ...

No blondes need apply.

436129_0001

The Matrimonial Bazar.  A Monthly Journal, Devoted to the Interests of Love, Courtship and Marriage  (Chicago, IL)  May 1876. Long before there were online dating services there were singles ads.  Local or community newspapers often have a section of advertisements for men seeking women, women seeking men, and a variety of other combinations.  SWF and DBM ...

Vimmin and politics!

465696_0001

Penny Yankee Doodle  (New York, NY).  November 2, 1850. This is one of a number of illustrated humor newspapers and periodicals that appeared in the 1840s and 1850s.  The editor says they are not an imitation of Punch from England, but, “I am myself alone – the original Genius of American Humor.”  There are the usual ...