Monthly Archives: April 2011

Two Years Before the Book

In April 1836, the future attorney and activist Richard Henry Dana was busy binding books aboard the brig Alert.  Yes, binding books, not reading them.  Dana might have been reading had a bad case of the measles and an even worse case of myopia not forced him to leave Harvard for a couple of years.  ...

“Listen my children and you shall hear,/ Of the midnight ride of…” Dr. Samuel Prescott?

Each April here at the American Antiquarian Society, our thoughts turn to Patriots’ Day, a holiday which we celebrated last week here in Massachusetts. Patriots’ Day commemorates the famous battles of Lexington and Concord, the battles that started the American Revolution.  We envision minutemen firing muskets on Lexington Green and gun smoke clouding Concord’s North ...

Join Us At the Book Fair!

An annual rite of spring for AAS curators is the Boston Book & Paper Exposition and Sale, one of two fairs sponsored annually by the Massachusetts and Rhode Island Antiquarian Booksellers (MARIAB). This spring’s fair will be held on Saturday, May 7, 2011 from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Shriner’s Auditorium, 99 Fordham ...

“The buckwheat cake was in her mouth. The tear was in her eye.”: Early American Cookery and Women’s History

Ever wonder what Susanna was chewing on in Stephen Foster’s famous folk song?  Curious about how women occupied their days at home in early America?  Interested in learning more about the relationship between early American housewives and their maids?  Whether you are interested in the history of American cooking, women’s history, domestic history, or the ...

The Acquisitions Table: The New Tale of a Tub

The New Tale of a Tub. London & New York: George Routledge and Sons, [ca. 1870] The Routledge firm was a popular transatlantic picture book publisher and a direct competitor of McLoughlin Bros. The New Tale of Tub is a humorous poem about two Bengalese gentlemen whose picnic feast is interrupted by the approach of a ...

Join us for “Teapot in a Tempest”

On the evening of December 16, 1773, a group of disguised Bostonians boarded three merchant ships and dumped more than forty-six tons of tea into Boston Harbor. The Boston Tea Party, as it later came to be known, was an audacious and revolutionary act. It electrified Massachusetts, set the stage for war, and cemented certain ...

Adopt-a-Book Update / Thank You Note

More than 50 friends of AAS joined curators and staff at our 4th annual Adopt-a-Book event on Tuesday, March 29. By evening’s end, a new fundraising record had been set: so far 101 donors have pledged $18,175 in support of AAS’s acquisitions program by adopting 144 collection items!  All of the ...